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The December-January 2020 Preview

The December-January 2020 Preview

The December-January 2020 Preview

STORY BY
PHOTOGRAPHY BY

The December-January 2020 Preview

STORY BY
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
‘‘

A LOOK INSIDE THE LATEST ISSUE OF COVEY RISE: VOLUME 8, NUMBER 1

Cover by Terry Allen

We all understand that cold winds are inescapable at this time of year. But wintry conditions should never impede our ability to enjoy the upland traditions for which we live. During your downtime during the holidays, get comfortable with this issue of Covey Rise next to the fire and live the lifestyle through the best stories the uplands have to offer.

The holiday season is ideal for thinking about warmer climates and planning your next great upland adventure. In “Paradise Found,” author Oliver Hartner describes quail hunting in Argentina with Will and Lauren Cowan, owners of HookFire Adventure Travel and Safaris. Will was quoted as saying, “In these valleys, there are rivers no human has ever fished, and quail that’ve never heard a shotgun. This is one of the most genuine places you’ll ever see. I’ve seen a dreamy look in people’s eyes when they talk about places like this.”

A new legislative session is right around the corner, and in “The Politics of Gun Dogs,” Nancy Anisfield describes the dog-related bills that matter to our legacy and urges us all to get involved to make a difference. “When it comes to how most of us feel about our gun dogs, the word ‘passionate’ has no ambiguity,” Nancy wrote. “We live that passion, and with vigilance, we can preserve the right to pursue it.”

These fireside stories are even better with your favorite whiskey, cigar, or wine. Or, consider preparing a Covey Rise recipe for the Christmas table. In this issue, you’ll find wild-game options from renowned chef and author Stacy Lyn Harris, Fred Minnick discusses finding bourbon abroad, and Jordan Mackay describes the allure of drinking big reds in the winter. Last but not least, our “On Point” section features the latest gifts and gear that make perfect presents for our readers.

We all understand that cold winds are inescapable at this time of year. But wintry conditions should never impede our ability to enjoy the upland traditions for which we live

The December-January 2020 Preview This article is published in the issue.
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ARTICLES FROM THE OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015 ISSUE
Life in Bronze

Filed In: ,

Liz Lewis employs several foundries in the Bozeman area to cast her lost-wax-style work. Recently, she has begun exploring the use of colored patinas to reproduce the coloration of sporting......

Being at Brays

Filed In: , , , ,

Located outside of Savannah, Georgia, and proximate to the charming coastal town of Beaufort, South Carolina, and within a short drive of Charleston—the current capital of Southern lifestyle—Brays...

Curated Fashions

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After spending more than eight years in the UK running retail shops, Ramona Brumby of Atlanta’s The London Trading Company came home. “My passion is anything to do with décor,......

Inside the October-November 20...

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This month’s cover photo of the German shorthaired pointer was taken at Pheasant Ridge by Terry Allen during our June-July 2015 feature coverage of Ferrari. As we traveled to Pheasant......

Bertuzzi Gullwings

Filed In: , , , ,

Bertuzzi shotguns have the unique design characteristic of ali di gabbiano, Italian for “the wings of a gull” as the sideplates spring outward like wings, revealing the lockwork inside. ...

Stealthy Ghosts

Filed In: , , ,

Judy Balog, who owns and runs Silvershot Weimaraners in Michigan with Jerry Gertiser, has owned Weimaraners for more than 20 years....

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The December-January 2020 Preview

A LOOK INSIDE THE LATEST ISSUE OF COVEY RISE: VOLUME 8, NUMBER 1

Cover by Terry Allen

We all understand that cold winds are inescapable at this time of year. But wintry conditions should never impede our ability to enjoy the upland traditions for which we live. During your downtime during the holidays, get comfortable with this issue of Covey Rise next to the fire and live the lifestyle through the best stories the uplands have to offer.

The holiday season is ideal for thinking about warmer climates and planning your next great upland adventure. In “Paradise Found,” author Oliver Hartner describes quail hunting in Argentina with Will and Lauren Cowan, owners of HookFire Adventure Travel and Safaris. Will was quoted as saying, “In these valleys, there are rivers no human has ever fished, and quail that’ve never heard a shotgun. This is one of the most genuine places you’ll ever see. I’ve seen a dreamy look in people’s eyes when they talk about places like this.”

A new legislative session is right around the corner, and in “The Politics of Gun Dogs,” Nancy Anisfield describes the dog-related bills that matter to our legacy and urges us all to get involved to make a difference. “When it comes to how most of us feel about our gun dogs, the word ‘passionate’ has no ambiguity,” Nancy wrote. “We live that passion, and with vigilance, we can preserve the right to pursue it.”

These fireside stories are even better with your favorite whiskey, cigar, or wine. Or, consider preparing a Covey Rise recipe for the Christmas table. In this issue, you’ll find wild-game options from renowned chef and author Stacy Lyn Harris, Fred Minnick discusses finding bourbon abroad, and Jordan Mackay describes the allure of drinking big reds in the winter. Last but not least, our “On Point” section features the latest gifts and gear that make perfect presents for our readers.

We all understand that cold winds are inescapable at this time of year. But wintry conditions should never impede our ability to enjoy the upland traditions for which we live

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