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Q + A with Photographer Brian Grossenbacher

Q + A with Photographer Brian Grossenbacher

STORY BY
PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Q + A with Photographer Brian Grossenbacher

STORY BY
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
‘‘

Brian Grossenbacher is an outdoor lifestyle photographer, specializing in upland hunting and all types of fishing. He is a father of two wonderful daughters and a firm believer of hard work and to let your work speak for itself.

Q: Where do you call home?

A: I am currently splitting time between Bozeman, Montana, and Winchester, Tennessee.

Q: Who are your main influences in the world of photography and why?

A: I truly admire Photographer Andy Anderson. His work is beautiful, instantly recognizable and truly inspiring. I also admire and respect the work of Jeff Moore. I look at every one of his images and wish that I had taken them.

Q: What is your favorite place where you’ve traveled on assignment and why?

A: I did a shoot deep in the jungles of Bolivia where we landed on the tiniest airstrip cut out for drug runners. We hired natives to take us upriver for 8 days in dugout canoes, and then we drifted back to the village for the last two. At the time, we were the second group of non-natives to have fished this river. We didn’t have a SAT phone, GPS, or really that much food—just a pilot’s word that he would come back in 10 days. We had jaguar tracks in our camp every night, and monkey on the dinner menu. It was a true adventure.

Q: What was most memorable for you from the story about Tinker Kennels in South Dakota?

A: Two things stand out for me. The first is that I was able to capture the chemistry and bond between father and son with John and David Thames and how those truly special moments will be preserved for them for years to come. The second is how the weather was rainy and gray and not ideal for photography. As it turned out, the flat light brought out the textures and patina of the rusted kennels, waxed-cotton chaps, gun scabbards, and worn leather boots. The true beauty of that shoot for me came in capturing the details.

Q: What was most memorable for you about the hunt for California quail in Baja Mexico? 

A: The Baja story was special in that I was invited to join a group of college friends for their annual trip with an amazingly talented outfitter, Arturo Mallo (a podium finisher in the Baja 1000 on motorcycle back in the day, amongst other talents). These guys all love great hunting and great food, with equal passions. We would hunt hard into the early afternoon, and then Arturo would drive us to these backroad vineyards where we would enjoy world class, multi course meals that would stretch into the early evening.

Q:  If you have 1 day off with no obligations, what do you do? 

A: I would ski or snowmobile, fish or hunt, with one of my daughters.

Q: Describe your style of photography — what and how do you like to be creative?

A: I try to disappear and capture the unscripted beauty and athleticism of authentic moments within our sport. If I can do all of that while utilizing creative composition and unique angles, then I’ve truly succeeded.

Q: What are your thoughts on the future of photography — in terms of print or digital?

A: The future of photography is scary and dynamic at the same time. There have never been more cameras in the field ever, and people are capturing amazing images with their phones. Companies can hold a photo contest and gather marketing materials for months at little to no cost. There is still plenty of work out there, but it is getting tighter.

Q: What is your favorite outdoor adventure — hunting, fishing, motors, etc.?

A: I love dirt biking on tight technical trails, and the same on snowmobiles in deep powder, but also a good day of fishing anywhere.

Q: What is your #1 bucket list trip or work assignment and why?

A: I would love to go on assignment (anywhere, any topic) for National Geographic. I have been fortunate to have published work in some amazing magazines, but Nat Geo has been elusive and still on my bucket list.

“A Better View” written by Matt Soberg and photographed by Brian Grossenbacher was originally published in Volume 8, Number 6 (Oct-Nov 2020) of Covey Rise.

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Q + A with Photographer Brian Grossenbacher

Brian Grossenbacher is an outdoor lifestyle photographer, specializing in upland hunting and all types of fishing. He is a father of two wonderful daughters and a firm believer of hard work and to let your work speak for itself.

Q: Where do you call home?

A: I am currently splitting time between Bozeman, Montana, and Winchester, Tennessee.

Q: Who are your main influences in the world of photography and why?

A: I truly admire Photographer Andy Anderson. His work is beautiful, instantly recognizable and truly inspiring. I also admire and respect the work of Jeff Moore. I look at every one of his images and wish that I had taken them.

Q: What is your favorite place where you’ve traveled on assignment and why?

A: I did a shoot deep in the jungles of Bolivia where we landed on the tiniest airstrip cut out for drug runners. We hired natives to take us upriver for 8 days in dugout canoes, and then we drifted back to the village for the last two. At the time, we were the second group of non-natives to have fished this river. We didn’t have a SAT phone, GPS, or really that much food—just a pilot’s word that he would come back in 10 days. We had jaguar tracks in our camp every night, and monkey on the dinner menu. It was a true adventure.

Q: What was most memorable for you from the story about Tinker Kennels in South Dakota?

A: Two things stand out for me. The first is that I was able to capture the chemistry and bond between father and son with John and David Thames and how those truly special moments will be preserved for them for years to come. The second is how the weather was rainy and gray and not ideal for photography. As it turned out, the flat light brought out the textures and patina of the rusted kennels, waxed-cotton chaps, gun scabbards, and worn leather boots. The true beauty of that shoot for me came in capturing the details.

Q: What was most memorable for you about the hunt for California quail in Baja Mexico? 

A: The Baja story was special in that I was invited to join a group of college friends for their annual trip with an amazingly talented outfitter, Arturo Mallo (a podium finisher in the Baja 1000 on motorcycle back in the day, amongst other talents). These guys all love great hunting and great food, with equal passions. We would hunt hard into the early afternoon, and then Arturo would drive us to these backroad vineyards where we would enjoy world class, multi course meals that would stretch into the early evening.

Q:  If you have 1 day off with no obligations, what do you do? 

A: I would ski or snowmobile, fish or hunt, with one of my daughters.

Q: Describe your style of photography — what and how do you like to be creative?

A: I try to disappear and capture the unscripted beauty and athleticism of authentic moments within our sport. If I can do all of that while utilizing creative composition and unique angles, then I’ve truly succeeded.

Q: What are your thoughts on the future of photography — in terms of print or digital?

A: The future of photography is scary and dynamic at the same time. There have never been more cameras in the field ever, and people are capturing amazing images with their phones. Companies can hold a photo contest and gather marketing materials for months at little to no cost. There is still plenty of work out there, but it is getting tighter.

Q: What is your favorite outdoor adventure — hunting, fishing, motors, etc.?

A: I love dirt biking on tight technical trails, and the same on snowmobiles in deep powder, but also a good day of fishing anywhere.

Q: What is your #1 bucket list trip or work assignment and why?

A: I would love to go on assignment (anywhere, any topic) for National Geographic. I have been fortunate to have published work in some amazing magazines, but Nat Geo has been elusive and still on my bucket list.

“A Better View” written by Matt Soberg and photographed by Brian Grossenbacher was originally published in Volume 8, Number 6 (Oct-Nov 2020) of Covey Rise.

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SUBSCRIBE TODAY

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