Subscribe now to receive the 10th Anniversary Collector’s Edition, included in your subscription price. >> Subscribe Now

Subscribe now to receive the 10th Anniversary Collector’s Edition, included in your subscription price. >> Subscribe Now

Subscribe Today
ADVERTISEMENT

Points Northwest- Bringing Up Pup

Points Northwest- Bringing Up Pup

Points Northwest- Bringing Up Pup

STORY BY Gary Lewis
PHOTOGRAPHY BY Gary Lewis

Points Northwest- Bringing Up Pup

STORY BY Gary Lewis
PHOTOGRAPHY BY Gary Lewis

Points Northwest- Bringing Up Pup

STORY BY Gary Lewis
PHOTOGRAPHY BY Gary Lewis
‘‘

My pup was 16 weeks old, legs too long and feet too big for the rest of her. Sometimes she missed the front step and went out flat on her chin. She’d been a part of the family for six weeks and our upland bird season was about to close. Maybe I was pushing too hard, but I didn’t want the season to end without taking her on a hunt.

We called her Liesl, which on a good day sounds like lethal and on other days rhymes with weasel. She’s a pudelpointer, bred for intelligence, love of water, retrieving instinct, and willingness to please. Her lineage can be traced back 135 years to 7 German hunting pudels and 20 English pointers.

Six years ago, my friend Steve Waller showed me how skilled the breed was at finding deer and elk antlers. Later, we hunted pheasants. Waller introduced me to breeder Rod Rist, and this year we got our first pudelpointer from Rist. Prey drive, both Rist and Waller told me, is the most important quality at this stage.

When the dog was 11 weeks, I introduced her to a chukar wing tied to a fishing line. She gave chase and when she learned she couldn’t catch it, she began to point, her right leg cocked and tail erect.

When she was 12 weeks, I hid a pheasant wing. When she found it, she tried to run away with it. I tugged on the rope leash and brought her back to praise her. Soon, I began to carry a BB gun along on 10-minute training “hunts.”

At 14 weeks, she pointed the pheasant wing and stood still for a record 12 seconds, every muscle atremble. At 15 weeks, she ran off the leash into a stand of juniper trees. She sniffed packrat nests and field mouse holes. She ran ahead and then halted to check on me. She quartered into the wind and stopped when she’d picked up the scent of something far off. I went around a fallen juniper and found her pointing tweety birds in the branches. Prey drive—she’s got it.

The question with any pup is when to take it on the first hunt. I wondered if I was doing the right thing, but off we went.

Points Northwest- Bringing Up Pup This article is published in the issue.
Click here to purchase this black issue
Intrested in buying other back issues?
Click here
FILED IN: , , ,
ARTICLES FROM THE OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015 ISSUE
Life in Bronze

Filed In: ,

Liz Lewis employs several foundries in the Bozeman area to cast her lost-wax-style work. Recently, she has begun exploring the use of colored patinas to reproduce the coloration of sporting......

Being at Brays

Filed In: , , , ,

Located outside of Savannah, Georgia, and proximate to the charming coastal town of Beaufort, South Carolina, and within a short drive of Charleston—the current capital of Southern lifestyle—Brays...

Curated Fashions

Filed In: , ,

After spending more than eight years in the UK running retail shops, Ramona Brumby of Atlanta’s The London Trading Company came home. “My passion is anything to do with décor,......

Inside the October-November 20...

Filed In:

This month’s cover photo of the German shorthaired pointer was taken at Pheasant Ridge by Terry Allen during our June-July 2015 feature coverage of Ferrari. As we traveled to Pheasant......

Bertuzzi Gullwings

Filed In: , , , ,

Bertuzzi shotguns have the unique design characteristic of ali di gabbiano, Italian for “the wings of a gull” as the sideplates spring outward like wings, revealing the lockwork inside. ...

Stealthy Ghosts

Filed In: , , ,

Judy Balog, who owns and runs Silvershot Weimaraners in Michigan with Jerry Gertiser, has owned Weimaraners for more than 20 years....

You may also like

Sturdy Brothers Waxed Canva...

This portable piece is handcrafted to last a lifet...

Viski Solid Copper Shot Gla...

These shot glasses are hand crafted and feature an...

Filson Desert Iron Knife

This Filson Folding Knife is handmade in Seattle w...

Points Northwest- Bringing Up Pup

My pup was 16 weeks old, legs too long and feet too big for the rest of her. Sometimes she missed the front step and went out flat on her chin. She’d been a part of the family for six weeks and our upland bird season was about to close. Maybe I was pushing too hard, but I didn’t want the season to end without taking her on a hunt.

We called her Liesl, which on a good day sounds like lethal and on other days rhymes with weasel. She’s a pudelpointer, bred for intelligence, love of water, retrieving instinct, and willingness to please. Her lineage can be traced back 135 years to 7 German hunting pudels and 20 English pointers.

Six years ago, my friend Steve Waller showed me how skilled the breed was at finding deer and elk antlers. Later, we hunted pheasants. Waller introduced me to breeder Rod Rist, and this year we got our first pudelpointer from Rist. Prey drive, both Rist and Waller told me, is the most important quality at this stage.

When the dog was 11 weeks, I introduced her to a chukar wing tied to a fishing line. She gave chase and when she learned she couldn’t catch it, she began to point, her right leg cocked and tail erect.

When she was 12 weeks, I hid a pheasant wing. When she found it, she tried to run away with it. I tugged on the rope leash and brought her back to praise her. Soon, I began to carry a BB gun along on 10-minute training “hunts.”

At 14 weeks, she pointed the pheasant wing and stood still for a record 12 seconds, every muscle atremble. At 15 weeks, she ran off the leash into a stand of juniper trees. She sniffed packrat nests and field mouse holes. She ran ahead and then halted to check on me. She quartered into the wind and stopped when she’d picked up the scent of something far off. I went around a fallen juniper and found her pointing tweety birds in the branches. Prey drive—she’s got it.

The question with any pup is when to take it on the first hunt. I wondered if I was doing the right thing, but off we went.

You may also like

Covey Rise Tumbler

Great for entertaining or to carry along for after...

The Brentwood Dog Collar By...

Upland & Downstream's true hunter collar. We set o...

Midweight Shooting Shirt

A good hunting shirt must be comfortable and rugge...