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The August-September 2019 Preview

The August-September 2019 Preview

The August-September 2019 Preview

STORY BY
PHOTOGRAPHY BY

The August-September 2019 Preview

STORY BY
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
‘‘

A LOOK INSIDE THE LATEST ISSUE OF COVEY RISE: VOLUME 7, NUMBER 5

About the Cover: Cover by Chip Laughton

The focused eyes of our bird dogs convey an unmatched devotion to the hunt, and this inherent loyalty was beautifully captured by Chip Laughton for the cover of our August-September issue. Chip’s iconic images have been featured by Covey Rise in over 30 different issues throughout our history, and this last spring, when we collaborated with him to plan this special cover, little did we know that it would be the last.

Chip once said, “Can you hear the picture? The art of photography is trying to take a two dimensional tool to create a three dimensional image, but we often forget the fourth dimension…imagination.” In this industry, elite talent often trumps all other perception. However, a rare few, like Chip, combine a personal character that meets, or even exceeds, their talent to leave an indelible mark on our world.

Covey Rise is proud to have had Chip’s talent, character, and imagination make their marks on the pages of our magazine over the years. He was a shining star who is now gone too soon and will certainly be missed by our team, our readers, and the world.

Inside the Issue

The pages of Covey Rise have always upheld the utmost of our sporting traditions, and this issue is no different. Whether it is a challenging hunt, a hard-earned meal, the celebratory cigar, or just the overall lifestyle we live, we are proud to bring you the stories that uphold a reverence to these important traditions now and glorify them into the future.

The article “A Vision for the Future,” by Marcus Janssen, showcases this principle by describing how Johann Fanzoj gunmakers bring their centuries of heritage to produce innovative—some call them avant-garde—shotguns using modern technology. In this piece, Daniela Fanzoj was quoted as saying: “Traditional, age-old crafts will only survive if you embrace the present. We want to stay true to our roots, to use our heritage and knowledge that has been garnered through eight generations, while combining it with the advantages of the 21st Century. This is where the masterpieces of the future will come from.”

Andrew Bogan’s “Hunting the Hashknife” features a Project Zinfandel charity hunt that not only spotlights the practice of bringing game to the table, but also supports society in a most honorable way. Bogan describes the importance of the hunt: “We were at the Hashknife to face the challenge of the hunt and bring its bounty to the table, to overcome adversity and to celebrate success. Most importantly, we were there in support of children with Down syndrome and a charity that helps them and their families to overcome adversity and celebrate their successes. My hope is that this serves as a powerful reminder to those of us who are fortunate enough to own hunting properties to use that privilege to support a wide variety of charitable causes across this great land.”

Roger Catchpole captures the passion for the hunt and the upland lifestyle at Fishing Creek Farms in Georgia in his article “Forming Tradition at Fishing Creek,” where he explains how the proprietors capitalized on their farm beginnings to accentuate an aura of family on their grounds for patrons who visit. He explained his sentiment: “Being one of the fortunate few to have hunted at Fishing Creek during its inaugural year and each subsequent season, I have witnessed firsthand the remarkable rise of this unique facility…what is perhaps most significant is that Fishing Creek has retained a private family atmosphere and exclusive use approach.”

Whether you are new to the hunting scene, a longtime and hardcore uplander, or you simply live vicariously through the pages of this very magazine, the generational differences between hunter experiences are not as diverse as they may seem. Take advantage of the knowledge and traditions that have brought us here as a hunting culture and let those core values perpetuate our practices as we move forward. The season is near, and we certainly hope you make the most of it.

The season is near, and we certainly hope you make the most of it.

The August-September 2019 Preview This article is published in the issue.
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The August-September 2019 Preview

A LOOK INSIDE THE LATEST ISSUE OF COVEY RISE: VOLUME 7, NUMBER 5

About the Cover: Cover by Chip Laughton

The focused eyes of our bird dogs convey an unmatched devotion to the hunt, and this inherent loyalty was beautifully captured by Chip Laughton for the cover of our August-September issue. Chip’s iconic images have been featured by Covey Rise in over 30 different issues throughout our history, and this last spring, when we collaborated with him to plan this special cover, little did we know that it would be the last.

Chip once said, “Can you hear the picture? The art of photography is trying to take a two dimensional tool to create a three dimensional image, but we often forget the fourth dimension…imagination.” In this industry, elite talent often trumps all other perception. However, a rare few, like Chip, combine a personal character that meets, or even exceeds, their talent to leave an indelible mark on our world.

Covey Rise is proud to have had Chip’s talent, character, and imagination make their marks on the pages of our magazine over the years. He was a shining star who is now gone too soon and will certainly be missed by our team, our readers, and the world.

Inside the Issue

The pages of Covey Rise have always upheld the utmost of our sporting traditions, and this issue is no different. Whether it is a challenging hunt, a hard-earned meal, the celebratory cigar, or just the overall lifestyle we live, we are proud to bring you the stories that uphold a reverence to these important traditions now and glorify them into the future.

The article “A Vision for the Future,” by Marcus Janssen, showcases this principle by describing how Johann Fanzoj gunmakers bring their centuries of heritage to produce innovative—some call them avant-garde—shotguns using modern technology. In this piece, Daniela Fanzoj was quoted as saying: “Traditional, age-old crafts will only survive if you embrace the present. We want to stay true to our roots, to use our heritage and knowledge that has been garnered through eight generations, while combining it with the advantages of the 21st Century. This is where the masterpieces of the future will come from.”

Andrew Bogan’s “Hunting the Hashknife” features a Project Zinfandel charity hunt that not only spotlights the practice of bringing game to the table, but also supports society in a most honorable way. Bogan describes the importance of the hunt: “We were at the Hashknife to face the challenge of the hunt and bring its bounty to the table, to overcome adversity and to celebrate success. Most importantly, we were there in support of children with Down syndrome and a charity that helps them and their families to overcome adversity and celebrate their successes. My hope is that this serves as a powerful reminder to those of us who are fortunate enough to own hunting properties to use that privilege to support a wide variety of charitable causes across this great land.”

Roger Catchpole captures the passion for the hunt and the upland lifestyle at Fishing Creek Farms in Georgia in his article “Forming Tradition at Fishing Creek,” where he explains how the proprietors capitalized on their farm beginnings to accentuate an aura of family on their grounds for patrons who visit. He explained his sentiment: “Being one of the fortunate few to have hunted at Fishing Creek during its inaugural year and each subsequent season, I have witnessed firsthand the remarkable rise of this unique facility…what is perhaps most significant is that Fishing Creek has retained a private family atmosphere and exclusive use approach.”

Whether you are new to the hunting scene, a longtime and hardcore uplander, or you simply live vicariously through the pages of this very magazine, the generational differences between hunter experiences are not as diverse as they may seem. Take advantage of the knowledge and traditions that have brought us here as a hunting culture and let those core values perpetuate our practices as we move forward. The season is near, and we certainly hope you make the most of it.

The season is near, and we certainly hope you make the most of it.

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